Judge Rules Remote Scan of Student’s Room Violation of Privacy

A recent federal court ruling against virtual proctoring room scans may affect future right to privacy laws across the country. During the pandemic, many schools and universities turned to virtual proctoring systems while administering tests and exams. Some of these systems required students to provide a video scan of their rooms in order to look…

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What Is Compensatory Education and Is My Child Entitled to It?

When classrooms moved to virtual and online learning in 2020 as a result of the pandemic, students of all ages and learning abilities faced adjustments and challenges. However, over a year later, many parents of special education students realized their children suffered bigger losses than previously thought. Students with learning disabilities and other special needs…

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Why You Should Request a Due Process Hearing for Your Child’s IEP

Parents of children with special needs or disabilities know that their children assistance to learn and reach their potential in the school setting.  Some school districts however do not or will not offer the services that these children need.  Federal and state law serves to protect these children but too often parents do not know…

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A School’s Duty to Prevent and Respond to Cyberbullying

In ordinary times, students face challenges in school. In addition to the academic pressures, students face academic and social pressures. They grow, mature, and interact with each other. While many of these development issues are constructive, other issues can be destructive. Students deal with peer pressure and want to fit in. The Internet and social…

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Bullying Zero Tolerance

All men, women, and children should be treated with dignity and respect.  Sadly, this is not always the case; some children experience and endure bullying.  There are zero tolerance policies for bullying in many schools, but not all schools deal with bullying effectively. Bullying zero tolerance is a term referring to anti-bullying policies, laws, and…

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Perry A. Craft Settles Two Lawsuits against Colleges on Behalf of His Clients

In the previous weeks, Perry A. Craft settled two lawsuits against institutions of higher learning. The suits asserted that the colleges had discriminated against students, questioned the process for dismissals, or raised issues with the honor code processor. In a separate matter, at a yet different college, students were accused of violating the honor code.…

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Honor Codes and Honor Code Violations

Colleges and universities often have honor codes. These honor codes typically require students not to give or receive aid on tests, exams, papers or assignments – or in other words, not to cheat. They may carry other requirements regarding student conduct or behavior. The honor code is typically explained when a student starts college, and…

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Student Disciplinary Hearing Authority

Schools in the state of Tennessee and elsewhere have rules and policies. When a student breaks said rules or policies, he or she faces consequences such as suspension and/or expulsion from school. There are procedures governing disciplinary actions imposed upon students, and part of those procedures is a Student Disciplinary Hearing Authority (SDHA), sometimes called…

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When do the Rehabilitation Act and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Apply?

Individuals with disabilities are humans, make valuable contributions to society, and deserve to be afforded the same respect, common decency, and opportunities as the respect, common decency, and opportunities given to individuals without disabilities.  Federal and state laws, such as the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 2004,…

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